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How to Make Project Meetings a Worthwhile Session?

How to Make Project Meetings a Worthwhile Session?

Project Meetings give a sense of dread to its participants and it’s no surprise that the project team’s mindset in regards to it is that most issues are not resolved and there is zero progress. One of the responsibilities of a project manager is to set project meetings in order to discuss and settle certain matters at hand. But how are you going to make the meeting worthwhile when no one seems concerned to even ask a question?

 

 

When you have a project meeting with a client or with your senior project manager, set an example to your team members by being an active participant. Here are some things to take into account to make the project meeting worthy of everyone’s time—and patience.

 

  • Participate in Project Meetings That Have a Clear Objective

It’s like writing an article—if you don’t have a topic, you are going nowhere. This also applies when you are in a project meeting. Discuss what are the changes in the project, its budget status or if the project needs more human or financial resources. This discussion must have a clear visual on the matter at hand. Let the participants know that the project meeting has a destination and a clear sense of purpose on why it exists in the first place. This is very crucial when the project has just started—there will be a lot of missing details that need to fill out, resources to add, and members’ skills to evaluate.

 

  • Suggest a Program for the Project Meeting

Another frustrating part of the meeting is that almost everyone seems to have no clue on the overall program. If there is none, suggest one. It also shows that you are concerned and looking forward to covering the matter. If the person conducting a meeting asks for your contribution, don’t shrug your shoulders and say, “It’s up to you.” Give him or her concrete outline on what everyone needs to discuss regarding the project’s stages. On the other hand, if you are the one presiding the meeting, list down the things you want to bring out in advance. Coax your participants by pinpointing the issues you’ve observed from them or their tasks and get into the meat of the discussion. For instance, “It has come to my attention that the people I assigned to the feasibility study  haven’t given me an update yet. How is it going?”

 

  • Do Your Research

Take notes and read the written details of the assembly passed around while it is ongoing. Reading them will give you an idea on what are the right questions to ask. Be reasonable if you disagree on the matter—there is always room for healthy arguments and from there, the people involved in the meeting might follow suit and give their own points. Do not spout claims unless you have proof to back it up. If you are unsure of what action to take when you are provided with instructions on a particular job, clarify, so no miscommunication will come out of it.

 

  • Focus on the Task Assigned To You

Ensure that you understand the whole point being made in the meeting. It is then expected that you have a full grasp on what are your obligations once the meeting is adjourned. When the meeting has a purpose, it also means you are given one. Don’t ask on what you should or shouldn’t do or what exactly you’re supposed to be doing—the discussion in the meeting already gave you that. If you already know your tasks but still unsure, verify it to the person in charge.

 

Apart from these, it’s a default habit to attend to project meetings, but it has become a boring routine to the eyes of people attending it. Boring in a sense that participants tend to just sit there and not taking notes or make an effort to raise questions. Do the opposite: keep a notebook handy during project meetings and take note of inquiries you want to bring to the forum. A meeting is an open forum where everyone is free to discuss improvements, developments, and concerns within the company or project. Treat it is an opportunity for a successful endeavor in the business.

 

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Management Square

Management Square is a service provider company specializing in Strategy Execution, Business Transformation, and Portfolio, Program and Project Management. Our mission is to create high quality trainings through professional excellence, and to provide a consultancy of choice through extensive learning experiences.

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